ALBANY, OR:

CONNECTING the DOTS

As part of the Sustainable Cities Initiative (SCI) at my university, I worked with three other students and the city of Albany, Oregon, to draft a plan to increase bicycling in Albany. My team's proposal centered around the need to connect schools with neighborhoods and downtown, and we chose to take advantage of existing wide streets and underused pathways. Branding the project 'Connect the Dots', we mapped out bike paths that would have color-coded painted circles and signage demarkating bicycles' right of way and raising awareness of the resource. This was supplemented by both large and small proposed projects, including a bridge to connect the two sides of the city across the railroad and highway, a new park, a more pedestrian- and bike-friendly connection at a major intersection, and the removal of a single chain-link fence to allow students access through a neighborhood. Our project was presented to a number of Albany politicians, including the mayor, and will hopefully be considered by the city council.

Our final poster

Central Albany
Central Albany

A map of most of the city, with our proposed changes indicated

Bike Boulevards
Bike Boulevards

A closer look at the bike boulevards, and their connections

Ninth Hill Park
Ninth Hill Park

The proposed pedestrian and bike bridge over the freeway and railroad, and new Ninth Hill Park

Geary and Queen
Geary and Queen

The changes we suggest at the major Geary and Queen intersection

How do bike boulevards work?
How do bike boulevards work?

A diagram illustrating how bike boulevards prioritize bicycle safety

Graphic Identity
Graphic Identity

The signage, colors, and icon of the suggested graphic identity